The Outside the Business Box's Podcast

The System of Rapport

January 24, 2024 Chad Murray
The Outside the Business Box's Podcast
The System of Rapport
Show Notes Transcript

Building rapport is the hardest sales item to teach. Having a system in place to train is essential in progress to building a world class service business. Mike Fasy and Chuck Roydhouse were on tonight's episode of Chat w/ Chad.

If you want to get the Chimney Closer app go to https://chimneycloser.com and click the button to schedule to purchase.

Good evening, everybody. Tonight, I'm chatting with Chad. I am so happy to have everybody be, I don't have a tan. I just got back from Puerto Rico. Uh, we didn't do as much sun. Uh, the beach was, was wavy. It was hard to get in there. Uh, we, uh, me and, uh, Mike Paisley, who's on tonight, will you try, we ventured out and, uh, we did that once we didn't do it the rest of the time we were there. So, uh, uh, we pretty much, uh, and everybody, we enjoyed the pool, uh, every day, every day and night after that. So welcome to the show tonight. Uh, I'm thinking we're going to have a great show, a fun. I know I've got Chuck Roydhouse and Mike Paisley in the background. We'll be bringing on here in a second, but I just wanted to kind of give a little. Shout out to how, you know, what happened over the, uh, in, uh, uh, last week in Lindeman, you, and it's kind of a little bit, I want to get a big shout out to Mark last night on surefire. Oh my God. One of the best shows he's ever done. Uh, it was really good. If you haven't watched surefire last night, go watch it again or watch it. If you haven't watched it, it was really, really good. And he mentioned me quite a bit. So, Hey, oh, you gotta like that. Right. So anyway, um, tonight's about rapport. You know, there's been a lot of talk about rapport. Uh, you know, I've talked to Alan about it. You're trying to train people to have rapport and rapport is, is something that we talked about at Lineman U a little bit, and it's the hardest thing to do. So. Uh, I'm going to bring you guys on here. So Mike, Chuck, hello. Sup Chad. And so Mike was, you know, we, we actually spent some time, uh, before it got there early and, uh, got an Airbnb, him and his, uh, a couple of managers, which are awesome guys. Um, and, uh, we had some alone time, uh, and, and partied a little bit. And of course we just talked chimney the whole time we're there essentially. Right. And, uh, uh, did that. It was, it was super fun. And then when the menu starts and, uh, it let them in, he was a little different. It's not a conference, right? I mean, it's not a convention, not an expo. Uh, I mean, you're not getting, you don't have like things you go by or walk around. I mean, you're literally in the room from. I believe it was from, what, eight to three o'clock? Three? Yeah. Yeah. For three days. And, uh, and they have, and I think what they wanted to do this time was motivation and, and get hearts strung. Speakers to really talk about culture. So it was a real culture, uh, uh, uh, show, I guess you'd say. And, uh, and it was good. Uh, Michael, what were your takeaways? Yeah, it was, um, I mean, a really nice, uh, venue. Um, you know, I was talking about, uh, you know, that was really my first big event that I had ever been to an industry. Or in for any industry. And, um, I remember being there in one of the back tables and talking to someone and they recommended the book traction and it really. set my business off on a totally different path than it would have been if I wouldn't have been there and had that conversation. But, um, yeah, it's a beautiful venue. Uh, I really liked the ocean in the waves. You know, I was having, I was having a good time, but, uh, and yeah, it wasn't, it was nice that it was kind of a smaller place. So, you know, just walking through the lobby, you'd run into people. Um, all the time, like some of the other venues we've been to, they're so massive that, you know, you could be walking from 15 minutes from one end to the other and not really run into people a lot. And so all the dinners were nice. Um, there's a lot of networking, a lot of hanging out. It's great. It was really good. So, I mean, I actually, you know, I don't even think I even told anybody, uh, this last week when we were there, but my personal menu was, I don't know. It was in Chicago, 2017, maybe 16. And, uh, um, that was where I'd asked to see Mike Bodart, uh, because we were really struggling, uh, to try to solve still what we are still trying to solve according to, uh, you know, and I walked into his office. He's gracious, sat me down, asked me about my numbers. And I, I thought at the time I knew. My numbers and what he asked my guys SPO was, and I'm like, what's that? He goes, there's sales average. And I'm like, and I spit out a number and I did know him. He goes, but does that include the, the appointments that they don't sell? And I went, no, why would I do that? He goes, well, cause it's not a real number. You gotta, you gotta average it out. SPO sales per opportunity. And so I just remember sitting across, if you've ever been in his PA, he's got a pretty good sized desk. And you're sitting, I'm sitting there, and I just remember going like this the whole time as we're talking. I just kept shrinking down. I just felt so little, right? And, and, when we got done, I left with the folder idea, how to build the folders, the giveaway to everybody, uh, SBOs, cameras, I didn't, we weren't doing camera inspections back then, uh, you know, level twos. Well, we didn't even do level twos yet then, we were just doing camera inspections, but at least we were doing that, you know, and I brought back that, within two weeks had everybody trained on doing everything and we flipped the, flipped the script, uh, completely, right away for the rest of the year and then ever since we've been, you know, evolving since then, but that was my first Lindemann, you know, and how much it did and he took me in, um, To talk to me, you know, which, you know, I didn't know anybody. This is before I knew who I was and I did that. And so, you know, I, I, this is my second Linda and you, I went to, and I think it's going to be on my, every time I have it, I'm definitely going. Chuck, you've been to Lindeman you before? Oh yeah. I went to last one I went to was in, um, Florida. Uh, and I want to say that was 2018 and I'd been to some other ones, but I can't remember where they were. Uh, my Insta great was where that happened. Mike and you was the crash of the, of the Insta great. Wasn't that up in Oregon or no, no, no, no, no. That was Oregon. Oregon was a convention. I did go to, that was like 2018, 19. Uh, but, uh, no, it was, it was at Lindeman U. He gave me a class to debut it there at Lindeman U and I did. And then just totally, you know, but, uh, but anyway, yeah, I don't even know if we're even selling anymore. I got to find out if we're, I'm sure we are, but, uh, I've gone to so many different things since then. It's just funny. And so. All right, well, let's, let's get on to the report thing. So, I mean, I'm sure if I can see it scrolling down below chimney closer. com. I mean, we've had some first opening success. They got some big companies on it. You know, I got four wins on it. I got. Uh, I've got a Wolfman on it. Um, I think Mike, you're going to look into doing it, you know, putting a couple of guys on it. So, and there's other companies I have on it. You can go to chimney closure. com. There's a list of some of the new people that are, they're doing it. And what this, and I'm just going to say it again, I'm not really going to advertise it too much, but I want to show how the app can be used, uh, as a training app. It's like one of those things. It's like documenting. You're documenting everything you do in, in, in voice. And it's not a form, it's not this, and you go in there, you type it up, and you can have an AI talk. It's not AI perfect. As a matter of fact, I talked to the owners of the app, I just talked to the owners of the app, and they talked about getting a better, they're already implementing a better AI voices into it that are better. And the learning path is that as we keep going and you play with the app, it's going to learn more about our processes. And it's going to actually start being a little bit better of a customer, a little bit meaner, not meaner, but a little bit more difficult, uh, as you know, to help you, you know, go along and do it and everything like that. So, I mean, it, it, it's the app that can really, uh, can really help. So it takes your scripting and makes it people memorize it. You get the role play. So anyway, but here's, I want to show tonight is what I built. To show people the system of report and, and it isn't perfect, but it will at least it's documented. And I'm going to play you guys this whole, it takes probably like three minutes to go through it. I'm going to play this to kind of give you an idea of what this is. Cause once you get my app and I make you an administrator, you can type wherever you want training and it's yours to have forever. So I'm going to do this. I've got to take, move you guys up here now, because this is, I've got to screen mirror my, my phone. So, I'm gonna come over here, start mirroring. Broadcast, come to here. Okay, I'm there, and I'm gonna go to the app. Alright, now I come here. I've got to figure out how to share my screen. Present, share screen. Alright, can everybody see the app? Yeah. Alright. Now let's hope that I can, it'll play it where you can hear it. Here we go. This is not memorization section. This is the training to give you the system building rapport. Yeah. Every customer should know three to five things about you. If not, then you are just a salesman selling chimney repairs. You are a human being first before you became a chimney sweep or technician. Your interests and experiences will help you gain trust and rapport. These are the categories you should be ready to chat about to your client when the opportunity presents itself. Then I gotta say, oh. Family. If you see a similar family situation at a client's house, bring up you have the same situation. Example, you see a family photo that there are three daughters and no boys. I, Chad Murray, have five daughters. I then tell them I love your family photo because I married my high school sweetheart and we have five daughters. I show them a family portrait. It always starts an off chimney point of beginning the journey of the client liking me. I like that. Pets. Almost every home has a pet. You probably have had a pet or you currently have a pet. Easiest compliment in a home is I like your pet. What's his name? Later when the pet is around you with the client, tell them about your pet. Chad Murray has a bulldog. Every client with a dog see a picture of Auggie looking into the camera with a bone in his mouth. Okay. Sports. If you see any sports memorabilia in the home, bring up your sports passion. Key here is to be positive. If they're a rival team, make it fun and keep it non conventional. The kids sports is always a good topic with the clients. If you see a cheerleader or football picture of their kids, then bring it up. Inquire about it. If you have a kid in the same sport, then you will get stories from the client. Key is to get your story out fast and let them talk more about their kids while you nod in happy bliss. Chad Murray always tells his clients he is a competition ice skater and a select volleyball player. It always brings out the select stories from the clients. I show a picture or two of my girls sports. Okay. Military, if you see a folded flag, picture of a serviceman or women, medals, anything saying they are retired, active, or have a child serving then at minimum thank them. Briefly tell your branch what you did, and where you served. I would then tell them when you got out. Turn the conversation directly to them. Ask about their loved one or their service experience. What did you do in the military, or what does your loved one do? Okay. Hobbies. If you see a bike in the entrance, ask if they do competitions. If you bike, then chat about it. Hobbies are so numerous that I can't write about it. If you have a hobby, then every client should know about it. If you discover a client's hobby, then you need to be the most interested person in the world about their hobby. Ask questions. Every client Chad Murray goes to knows he has a cabin in northeast Oklahoma. He hunts, and had a big enough cabin to sleep 20 people. He regularly has his family and friends up to the cabin. Okay. We sell experiences, fires and experience. It's not cheap to sell a rip and replace. It's not cheap to remodel a fireplace or a chimney that's been struck by lightning. What sets you apart from your competition? Your pricing is not what's selling over your competition. It's you. People purchase from people they like. Say it. People purchase from people they like. Go be a salesperson and sell the repairs or go be the most interesting chimney person showing up to sell the client the repairs. It's your choice to start being you and follow this training. Your results will double or even 10x. Alright. So, stop sharing. Okay. So, next. Um. So, yeah, so, I mean, that is how I'm training people just to get the information of how to do it. It's not perfect. The AI will get better and it'll sound better. And I'm actually, some of those, uh, corrections, like where it said, be, I've got already that fixed. I just was in the wrong account. I should have went to another account that already had been updated for the correction and stuff. But, but the idea is how do you take somebody that we hire new? And tell them all this information about chimneys, la la la, you know, custom, you know, uh, you know, uh, just all this stuff about water intrusion, all this stuff about, you know, uh, penetration of, of, or clearance of combustible, just whatever. We're, we're, we're training them all this information and then we tell them to go out there and just be you. It's so hard, you know, I mean, they're, they're so, you know, in their first learning, you've got to tell them how to be you. You know, how do you be you? Well, we got to give them the scenarios. Look around the house as you're there, you know, you think of pet sports, family, uh, hobbies and, uh, and military right there. They can see that stuff clicks in their brain and talk about it, whatever. I don't quite tell them quite yet in the app when to really bring it up, except for when you walk in, say something nice about the house, start to report like that, you're not just the chimney guy there, you're whoever in their house to sell them, whatever they might be. So. I mean, that is what that makes the difference between a 2 to 3 million sales guy and a guy at a million or less is they buy from people and they know you hear that all the time, but guys, what do you think about that? Yeah, I mean, that's, that's a super good start lays, lays the base level down. Um, you know, our guys, we have, uh, All the customers get a picture of our technician and a bio before they show up. So I make sure the bios are like funny and interesting and, and like strange little talking points about them. And a lot of times that really helps the customer already like ask them, you know, intimate questions about their life or whatever they can connect with. Um, I actually train our technicians kind of the almost opposite in a way. You know, you're like, Hey, you need to learn these things about me. We're like, Hey, learn, you know, three details about the customer or after the job, like tell me about this customer. Alan Rush is great at that. You know, after the job, he'll be in the truck with them. Like. What were their hobbies? What were their this or that? If you don't know it, then, you know, it clearly didn't build a rapport. That's coming. That was actually the next part of that. Uh, you know, cause it's, uh, I, I, I've always taught just to try to break the ice and I just try to teach them how to talk to the customer as a human being. Right. You know, I mean, and then, and then you go from there. And, but if you go through the training. As I, as I added that in there, I'm, I'm telling, I'm actually telling them, you want to talk about one to two minutes about you and you want to hear four to five minutes about them. And so I'm, I'm, I'm easing it in, you know, again, I don't want to overload everybody in the training app of just everything all at once, you know, you got to kind of get them good at a couple of things, get them good at telling about themselves. Everybody's easy. It's easy to talk about yourself, right? It's hard to ask people about other people. So if you can train them into talking about themselves, you're not going to open up the window to ask more about what they're doing and then. Flip the switch on, yeah, I was in the Marine Corps, you know, blah, blah, blah. I was stationed there. I see you have a flag over there. Tell me about that flag. I'm really interested, right? And then now, now you put your ears on it, and you listen, and you be a person. And then hopefully, as you're learning stuff, it'll help you, at the end, make the sale. You know, you have the rapport. You know, I find, this is funny. Here's where I find rapport, with my personality, when I'm out at a house, or just trying to sell anybody anything. If I can build that rapport all the way through the beginning before we get to the table, and then once we're at the table, I'm still building a rapport, talking about me, asking about them, and blah, blah, blah. The funny thing is, is when they say I gotta think about it, my little rebuttal would be, because I got to know them good enough in the last hour. I'm comfortable to go. Why, what do you need to wait for? Why do you need to wait? I don't even go in to all these big rebuttals. Like, why do you need to wait? You know, you know, you need it. I mean, who else is going to do it better than me? And I would say that kind of stuff. I would flip half my customers right there. I'm like, there's no need to wait. You know, you know, let's do this. And, uh, because I was comfortable at being that up front with probably 60 to 70 percent of my clients, when they gave me that rebuttal, I was just right at them. It's like, why? Let's do this. I can get you on the schedule now. And, uh, and I would flip them. I would flip them like that. I mean, I was good at it, you know? Uh, and so, yeah, Chuck, talk to me, man. So when I do sales training and when I did it, when I had my chimney business, the biggest thing, it's always good to ask questions. They, you know, we've all heard the saying about you have two ears and one mouth for a reason. The biggest thing is that it has to be genuine. You have to be comfortable in your own skin. You can't just learn a script. Because it'll come out to, hi, how you doing? Oh, I see the flag out front. Were you in the army? Huh? Wow. I was never in the army. Okay. Well, is that your Woodstow? And, and it becomes, you know, I would tell people, think about if you were. Um, maybe at a bar and you just wanted to introduce yourself to somebody, or maybe you were taken home by your girlfriend or your boyfriend, and you were meeting, you know, the parents, the cousins at Christmas or Thanksgiving, that's going to be uncomfortable for everybody. You don't know each other. So the best thing to do is put everything in the best light. And find a commonality. But again, the key that you're talking about is you always have the other person talk more than what you do. And it's just like the sales process of you never ask a question that you can't have a follow up. You don't want to give anybody, Hey, do you have any problem driving here? No, no, it was fine. That doesn't go anywhere. A better way would be like, boy, I had a heck of a time getting here. You know, there was an accident by the stop sign. They rerouted me around the corner. Did you see any of that? Is that common in this neighborhood? Well, now they've got to answer that. And that's, but you have to be comfortable. And that's a little bit of a thing that has to be learned by some people. A lot of people comes to them naturally. Well, the thing about comfortability is that's where the scripts come in because you get their brain to do it and and you're right It is it's not what it's like falling down riding a bike. It is gonna sound scripted when you start It has to have that process and that system of what to say until they get comfortable in their own skin Because what happens when we put somebody out there, they have just learned all this stuff and now it's like, if, if they have to just literally go off of memory and they don't really have the full process, they're not going to be as good. So, I mean, we train in our app, learn the script, but you still got to go out and do you. I mean, this is your process. You know, you memorize this. You get it out there. Nobody's going to memorize a script, especially as detailed as you learn on my app, exactly like the script. You have to pass each app to try to get it at least 60 percent to pass. But you, I don't expect you, nor does anyone expect you, you're going to go out there and you're going to sound exactly like that script. But you're going to have all the nuggets for each section of, as you call, you knock on the door. You walk in, you know, you're bringing yourself to that, right? And then you're going to learn and you tell people, look for all the stuff, get the report, talk. The main thing is if you just say, find stuff in the room to talk about, that there do. The problem is if you just leave it at that. They have no idea what to look for, you know, find the flag, find the picture of it. When the dog comes up and is jumping all over you, you know, there's a, there's a 90 year old cat sitting on the, on the, uh, on the couch that could barely move. You know, um, you know, you see it, you see, uh, uh, uh, a trophy or two, or, you know, homework. There's just so much that you can trigger in your mind to just start up a conversation and see, I never had to be trained in this. I just naturally talk to people. I mean, so it's, and I've hired a whole bunch of rocks that work for me that literally, I mean, if I could listen to him, and that would be Rilla called call, uh, uh, call Alan rush to be on Rilla. You want to find out exactly what the guys are saying, call him. He'll get you on that. But I can tell you, if I were a fly on the wall and some of the people that I know, after I got to know them, that I've hired rocks. They probably never, when you leave, they know nothing about the client, and they knew nothing about them, and their SPO is probably 200, 200, you know, and they didn't last long. Our sales lead has a game he plays when he's training. It's kind of a role play thing where he basically just says, how long can you go with just asking open ended questions and try and have a whole conversation for as long as you can just, and, uh, you know, a good one I think he teaches is just like, tell me more about that. You know, which comes in really handy in the comfort survey when we're asking about, um, you know, what do you. Enjoy using your fireplace for, Oh, building or having kids around. Like, man, that's not the end of that answer. Like you got to dig into that and get, you know, get the rest of that story. Tell me more about that. Tell me more about that. And, uh, and, uh, And just the next question is, is where you're just going to listen. It's so it works. So it was, it was one of the things that we learned when I learned in trying to sell coaching when I'm on zoom calls and stuff, and you know, I wanted to hear their, you know, I want to hear them. Tell me their pains and stuff. And instead of just doing the bullet list, I got to go, well, tell me more about that. And then you just shut up and talk and then you just let people just go off. So before I get to the Rob, Rob came on here and said, happy Wednesday from Wisconsin, Tim McGill training in Merrill, Wisconsin. Hey, hey Rob, I hope it's going good up there. Uh, I know it's cold as you know, what up there and, uh, sorry to hear about your Green Bay Packers, you know, but you know, uh, they did get knocked out and I'm so happy that. Uh they did. Ha ha ha! Uh after what the pounding they did to my cowboys! What a terrible team. Anyway. Um, so anyway, uh, yeah, the fun thing is, and I think this is, and Mike, you can probably really attest to this, and maybe even you Chuck, probably, nobody really trained on role playing, and, you know, when we were growing up in this, right, it wasn't really a lot of stuff that a lot of companies did to help their people out, like they trained them, go, go do it, you know, study your inspections, make sure your inspections are good, but there was no real role play. Right. I have always done only one role play has been with me since day one. That's why do you buy our chimney gap? My guys, if you in my company, you have to tell me why do you buy our chimney gap? And I've been doing that for 27 years. And so, and it's funny, uh, last year Trumbull asked me about it and I was, I was having a bad day. I think I had a headache and I like, I like messed it up. Just trying to tell him, tell me about it. I heard this much about it. I'm like, okay, you know, it covers the entire time. I just had a pair of terrible times. But anyway, Um, but full coverage, coverage to the guests, everyone should be selling them. I mean, definitely change your business if you're not, but, uh, but we're saying was never not something that, you know, we started doing until like four or five years ago. Yeah. The first time I was ever even introduced to anything like that was actually at the Lindeman event eight years ago, I remember being outside with the Lindeman reps and they're like trying to have me role play and, and go through these sales things. And I was totally like. Not into it. I remember being like, what is this? I don't get it. I'm not, uh, just not into it at all. And then now, you know, when we do our standard and standards and expectations on day one, actually even before that in the interviews, you know, we just say, Hey, we're a role play culture. We practice before the big game. It's just going to be something that you're going to do if you're if you join our team. And, um, day one, it's role playing. You learn, you will learn. Everybody's uncomfortable doing it when they start, you just start, right? Cause you, cause you have to think about, I've got to get out in front of your body, my peers, I've got to act and do what I, my training and see if I get it right, you know, and make sure that I think you have to think, but it's, the reason why role playing is so powerful is because when you do it in front of all your peers, they know if you're saying it wrong, you know, they know if you had a bad answer or a bad day, and if you're in a good company, they're going to help you out and all that kind of stuff. Right. If you a customer, they don't have a clue if you did it wrong. So, I mean, it's easy to go out to a customer and and, and say the wrong things and nobody, they don't know any better. But when you, but when you all of a sudden have to come in front of a house, in front of the house and you have to tell everybody and you're playing with someone else and you, and you, and you buble through it. Well, I mean, you're, you're kind of getting called out, but you got to know your stuff, you know, and that's, it's not everybody coming down on you. Cause you're going to feel bad. That's the afterword, but at the beginning, you're all super nervous just because you're not used to being on stage, right? But if you can do it on stage, you're going to kill it out there with the customers. And that's where, that's where it really, really goes to shine. And I can always tell when we're role playing with someone like, Oh God, we hired a rock. The guy was good in the interview, but my God, this guy cannot role play with me at all. Yeah, role playing in a group setting, I mean, that's That's another added layer of stress. I mean, you definitely want some stress to mimic what it's going to be like in front of a customer. You know, you've, you've been to my place. We build those three tiny living, you know, It wouldn't not the size of a living room size of a tiny bedroom, but we have three of them, each of them with, uh, different memorabilia or things about them to build rapport and, you know, pretend you're in three different houses, each one actually progressively with less things to build rapport off of. And, um, I don't think we ever got it, but the goal was to, to get a nerf gun for the last one, you know, have nothing in the room, build rapport off of, I think there's a wheelchair in there, um, you know, build rapport off a wheelchair and then, and then have the, the trainer sit there with a nerf gun pointed at you just to add that little bit of stress. So it's not, you know, not too carefree. Uh. You know, you know, it'd be good if everybody had a Nerf gun and when you messed up, everybody gets to shoot you. Yeah, we have those, uh, we ordered them, um, they're like these big cotton balls and they're really, they're meant to be like summer snowballs. And so we have them in these big bowls, like there's a big bowl in the tech room and there's a big bowl in the kids, uh, uh, daycare room and throw these snowballs around, making a mess all over. Um, so have you guys done, I know you guys are on Rilla now. Have you, have you guys, have you guys been able to, uh, uh, really showcase and help people out to build rapport? Because of RILA, since you started it? Oh yeah, so I haven't personally been on RILA, but I hear him talking about it a lot and I kind of I've seen how it works over their shoulders, but, um, so part of it is it has these scores built in, uh, for instance, there's a patient score and the patient score is literally how long do you start talking after the customer finishes talking so very low patient score would be like you're literally cutting them off or. Do you give it a second? And then, you know, they're fully done with what they're saying, and then you're responding. Um, and the other score is a listen to talk ratio. So you've been talking about, you know, um, I thought it was, I thought the goal was to be way more dramatic, like maybe, um, 80, 20, or sorry, 20, 80, listen to talk. Ratio, but, um, their data is like some of the best in the country is more like 60, 40. Yeah. Um, and then for building rapport, you know, you can, you can basically cut out snippets of the conversation and save it to a folder, uh, that says best practices or worse, you know, this is a fail, there's a fail folder and there's a best practice folder for, and sections for building rapport. So other texts can listen. Hey. This guy did this amazing and kind of, and, and, uh, we just got mixed in. So we're under Ellen rushes umbrella for that. And, um, the companies that are using Allen rush all got their stuff kind of mixed up together, I think on purpose in this last week. So at least right now we have access to all these other companies recordings, which is kind of interesting to see how they're doing it. That's cool. So in, so I mean, honestly, the way I'm hoping, the way I'm looking at stuff is I'm hoping that people can buy the chimney closer, get on that app, learn, learn the process. And by the way, we were just sponsored by Chimney Saver and so Saver Systems, they're, they sponsored me. If you go to the website, you'll see their logo on there. Um. Uh, so I'm going to be adding a, a new, uh, sales process for the chimney saver products, uh, on there. Uh, and then if any other, if anyone's listening, that is a manufacturer, you want to add your products to it, give me a call and then whenever you have a new product out, I'll teach. You know, we'll, we'll, we'll work with you to how you want everyone to teach it and they can come on Chimney, uh, Chimney Closure to learn how to, to teach it like that fast. Um, uh, but, and then you get that, you got the verbiage down, you got that, if you can get on Alan Rush's, uh, two year waiting list and get with him there and have him come out, but then obviously, you know, if you have the right CRM, you can go sign up with Arilla. And start recording out there, but I wanted to bring a deliverable that everyone can start learning how to the processes and the speech before and the training and then I mean the real thing is spectacular and so, uh, that that's that's next level stuff, but you gotta know what to say first. The guy's gotta be in the house first. We all don't say and that's a deliverable that I wanted to bring to the to the deal. And so Um, I, I want, I'm going to be trying to be building in rapport and building different things. I remember you were talking about this before. What's up, Steve? Hey, Steve. Hey. Um, yeah, I missed you in, uh, in Puerto Rico. Steve is busy having a baby. Busy having babies, baby. Beautiful babies, too, by the way. Uh, we were talking about the comfort survey. We're like both working on the same thing. Um, you know, and our comfort survey, I think it's 10 questions and it's, it's, I actually want to build even more in there. And it's, you know, in our chimney inspection software, Bare Hands Pro, it's in the beginning. And I love that because it's really an excuse, you know, it'd be an awkward 10 questions to ask in a doorway or in front of the fireplace. It's like kind of forces you to sit down at the kitchen table. Um, it's a good excuse to the technicians like, yeah, this is part of our process. You know, I'm going to ask you these questions and, and I like to say, say to them, you know, where you start is where you finish. So start at the kitchen table makes it super easy to set the tone for the appointment, and then to circle back there at the end for the, you know, going over the inspection report proposal and all that. But yeah, it's like these in depth questions about why you're there why you know what they want to get out of the system, which before we were doing that our technicians were asking questions but it was maybe like two or three. This wasn't that in depth. And now we're asking stuff like has to have to do with indoor air quality. Like, are you breathing? You know, what, what are you smelling? What are you, are you having any issues with that? Um, you know, HVAC is really good at that. And, uh, I, we haven't been, I don't know if other chimney companies are, but we, you know, it's a huge deal. People breathe in, you know, carcinogens all year round because they're not getting their chimneys cleaned in the spring. You can smell it. It's gross. I can smell it walking into people's houses sometimes. I don't do that. You know, your kids are breathing that. Like, yeah, I, so I haven't built that in a chimney closer yet. Cause I'm still trying to figure out, I'm doing it as 1. 0 right now. And then it'll just continue to 2. 0, but that's something that, uh, that is, it's going to be 2. 0 is, is, is, is getting to the fact of training the people, how to have the right questions and, and whatever, and. And the start at the table is definitely something that I think is going to change the industry if they, if they want to start, you're going to start seeing guys that are doing the, the standup tablet, right? You know, stand, you're like, I've always done, you know, the standup tablet, but then I've always sat down. I've always sat down at a table that's been my deal for 27 years. I have never closed standing up. Unless the customer just was a jackass and just said, you know, wouldn't let me in the door after I was outside doing something. But generally I'm at the couch, wherever they're, I asked them where they're, I used to ask them where they're comfortable. I didn't care. I could, I could do it anywhere. And then my last few years when I was out, when I was training back in 17, I was training technicians, uh, our sales guys. I would definitely get to the table. I would always look for the, whatever the table or the, or the, or the kitchen island, you know, depending on which was easier for, you know, look more comfortable, uh, but I love, I absolutely love the idea, you know, come in, you know, uh, you know, introduce yourself, say something nice about the house and then, oh, there's the fireplace. Great. Listen, can we sit over there? I'm going to go through some questions. I want to know about your fireplace. I want to know your relationship with it. And I want to know where our goals are with the fireplace. So maybe we sit down and then go into the, you know, all these different, uh, questions, air quality was not on my radar. I'm glad you said that that's a really good question to talk about. Uh, and, and then, but try to come up with, you know, a good, you know, 10, 15 questions and kind of play that game. You're talking about how many questions can I ask to get to know your fireplace and think about it like this. I mean. I guarantee it, there's competitors. There's no way. I mean, you just show right away the interest, right? And you care about their fireplace. How many other guys show up and go, where's your fireplace? I gotta get my camera set up, and I'm gonna set up, and I'm gonna give you a long list of shit we gotta do. It's gonna be expensive, get ready, bend over, cause here we come. You wanna use your fireplace. This is what it's going to be, you know, dictator, dictator salesman. Right. And, uh, and yeah, I mean, you can do that in some markets, but you damn sure can't do that in Texas. You better become a friend of them while you're there because they don't need their fireball. Unless it's leaking or got a dead animal in it. They don't need it. I mean, so you better show that they love their fireplace and they want to use it. And you're, you're, you're going to give them solutions and give them what they want. Right. Like Galen always says, who's the hero? Are you the hero or customer of the hero? You know? And so, right. And a lot of HVAC guys are, are, I mean, they take this to, to a pretty intense degree where they get rid of their tablet, they have a pen and paper. And part of their like active listening is taking really, really good notes about whatever the customer is saying. So we, we just all input it into bare hands pro on the tablet as they're going along, then that way it saves it. Um, It doesn't, it doesn't push it out on the inspection report that the customer sees, but it pushes it out in, in kind of an internal report that we can see that way, if we're following up with the customer later or whatever, we still know what their goals were, but that is a big part of it too, just active listening, putting in all the notes there and showing them that, you know. You care about it. I mean, how else are you gonna live version right now? Mike? I believe that's just for us. We're still messing with that and um, probably in a week or two. We'll push that Uh to the market version you want to talk about bearhounds for a little bit. Here's your time, man Well bearhands pro we're um We've actually been, uh, rebuilding the whole thing. We, you know, software is kind of funny like that. I mean, you know, uh, we, we have a lot of features that we want to build in and the way that it was going, we're kind of having to, to band aid them on. And so we opted for, you know, to kind of put new features on a pause, um, and rebuild the whole thing. Uh, and it's about a year process. We're about halfway through. But in, in about six months, we'll have a new version and it's going to be bad ass. And one of the things that I really want to build in is that I think will help a lot of people is gas diagnostic flows. For my company, getting, getting, getting our gas division going was such a struggle. Um, it's, you know, there's a lot of these classes that are fantastic. Um. We had Bob Weiss out, we had Jim Brewer out, but gas is not a two day hands on class. I mean, tremendously helpful, and I can't thank those guys enough for, for helping us with that. But it's just so much more than a two day class. But what we could do in Bare Hands Pro is, you know, there's like six valves, and we can make videos, and if, as long as the technician knows how to use the tools, They can just follow step by step through, through a diagnostic flow. And, um, not that there shouldn't be training. There should still all be all that training, but man, it can get your gas division up and going like way easier than, than what we endured when we got started. So that's one of the things I'm super excited about, but, um, yeah, we're about six months off from a big relaunch and I can't wait. And so, I mean, me and Mark are developing a CRM service galaxy and we, As you know, it's taken us two years. We thought we could get it out in like eight to 10 months. Yeah, no. And so we have a launch date now of pre selling, uh, or, uh, uh, I guess you'd say beta testing for people, uh, we're really looking at beta testing, uh, in uh, June. So we should be live hopefully for anybody. Anybody can beta test it. We're going to probably let, you know, as many people that want to do it, you'll still pay for it. But you know, we'll, we'll do it at a little bit of a discount. Possibly we'll get away and see. Uh, but yeah, we're, we're excited. And what we're doing, we have our own. Way to inspect the chimney in there But we're gonna bring barehands pro and the other Software in as well and you get to choose which one you want to use And so you can use ours. Sometimes you can use ours. You might use barehands now You have to have a subscription to barehands pro, you know, it's going to be where you don't you know You still have to have that and then come to our crm just like you do with Service site and stuff like that. So we'll have the option, you know, to use ours and Mike's, you know, for easy stuff or whatever, but I can't wait to get on, you know, and start using the bare hands pro as well. So, I mean, I'm, I'm excited. And a big part of your CRM is you guys built, hey Jack, man, I had a ton of fun hanging out with Jack in Puerto Rico. Like, I really, really, um, appreciate you, man. You're a good dude. You and your wife. Let's just stay on the Jack story here now. Jack, he's a unique individual. The guy is always upbeat. The guy has always got something good to ask. And he's genuinely kind and caring. You just don't find guys that have that soul and that spirit like that. I mean, Trumbull's one of them. You're one of them. I'm not one of them. I mean, I, I don't have that. Mark Stoner is one of those. You guys all just have the, the it to attraction, you know, in what you guys put out in the world and the way you guys are, it's, it's just so special. I love our group that we're forming. It's like a new, we have people wanting to come into our group. And we're forming this little dynamic, which is not a click. We'll let anybody on me, but we are really becoming, uh, learning together. And, and I think Jack and I, we're going to own Jackson. I mean, I already own Jackson, but Jack's coming up and I'm going to, I'm wearing, I want him to own it with me. So, uh, I'm trying to, I would try to be more like y'all. And so, um, Well, thanks Jack, but no, you really are special to the industry. I, and I'm, I'm honored to have you in my state and to know, and to know you. So anyway, um, what were we talking about? Um, so someone was asking me about CRMs and service Titan, and we got on the topic of scheduling algorithms. Or like a dispatch AI or whatever you want to call it. Um, unless it's a super simple, like one service, one area, one thing, I still have yet to see that functional, you know, like the guy who cuts my hair. They have that because one service, one thing. You know, maybe multiple people and you can find a time slot or calendly, you know, but to have a, a functional one with drive time and some more variables, you know, resources, maybe a one tech has a 40 foot ladder. One doesn't, um, you know, maybe you have a gas division, what division, uh, yeah. So that's part of your thing, right? Yeah. And, you know, and, and it works the way you've been playing with it. And it is awesome. If you're a three truck company, I mean, it'll work. If you're a one trick, I'm going to say, well, if you're a three truck company and above my scheduling app or my CRM that we're coming out with. Your girls never have to look at a map. You're you're I say, girls, your call center, people never have to look at a map. They literally go through it, put the, put it in and it's going to, you have two modes, you can put it in first available, which does not help routing. Matter of fact, that sucks for routing, but it'll still give it to you. Or you put it in, we call it AMR. And I don't remember what AMR stands for. My brother and I made it up. It's AI something, you know, remote. I don't remember what it was, but, uh, uh, you put it in AMR mode. And it's fits the best time for your company. That's the closest person is doing that, that one of your suites or educators. Uh, or you want to call them or even job who is qualified to do the job Closest appointments that they have to it and then offers those timings going to offer you Five hot times which are probably within a day or two or three You know if you're we are first available, but it's going to route it to the best one But it's always going to give you the best first available for the company like for instance If your book got a week You don't really care if that customer goes on next Friday or next Thursday, if they're available for both. And Friday is a better route. You're going to pick Friday. If it's Friday, they may only be a mile away from their appointment before, but Thursday they might be six miles away of what was first available, but it's six miles away when, if I just offer them next Friday, it's only a mile away. And so it works, it's phenomenal. And so, uh, that was the first thing that we started when we started is building that out and then it's not AI, it's just done by, like you said, uh, we don't have the ladder thing on there, but we do have a technician skills. Um, uh, the, the, you get to set what the desirable, uh, closest thing is. So if you're in a smaller city or something, you want to say, well, I really want it to seek out immediately as fast, something. Only three miles away from the last client. So the five hot ones will only show the three mile ones and then it'll show them, you can scroll down for every open time after that below it, but it's going to put it, it's going to put it in order for how far away it is from other appointments. And so it's, it's super, it's good. It's super cool. And there's a lot of other super cool stuff. I'm going to keep the lid on it a little bit. Uh, but it is, it is going to be, we're hoping to, uh, uh, take a lot of people in the chimney industry, because it is literally built by Mark, me and my brother, and so, uh, and it's going to really, really, I think help a lot of people that, that can't afford service Titan. Don't want to go through the pain of going through the service time and training. Um, you know, really the, we're really, I think what we're focusing on is really the, the zero to like seven or eight truck companies, uh, right in there. And that's kind of the sweet spot of the industry anyway. Uh, uh, you know, where people are, uh, I have no idea what our price point is going to be yet. Uh, we still are trying to figure out what our cogs are, uh, and everything. Uh, but it isn't going to be. Uh, as much a service site and I'll say that there's a lot of people on aging, you know, aging CRMs, you know, uh, smart service, iFleet, that kind of thing. And, um, but, you know, Chad, you, um, I remember you telling me a long time ago, how important it was for is basically dispatching for revenue. Um, you know, dispatching your production side for revenue instead of just filling the board up. And we also have a CSR that's dedicated for basically ironing out the schedule for efficiency, for gaps, or just moving things around for drive time. I mean, you can kind of have a person it's rough. Cause if you're like two, three trucks. And one town, one city, you can kind of, a person can kind of do that. A CSR can, as they're booking kind of schedule and see this stuff, but past like five, six trucks, and especially if you have a service area, that's multiple cities, or you're trying to juggle these different things, or you have gas division, wood division, heart division, it just begins to be too much. And a CSR, like ideally. They have tunnel vision. They're just book the job, like book the job, book the job. And so that other role, I mean, it's so easily pays for itself. Plus, I mean, if you, the way, when I was training her for the importance of this position, we just put the numbers on it. We said, okay, take a, take a chimney guy, you know, his say close rates, 33%, his, um, Average tickets, average sales, six grand. So six grand divided in a third is 2000 bucks. So if he has a gap on his schedule, for whatever reason, that's a 2, 000 gap. So we're going to add up all the gaps and that's going to be basically a scorecard for the day. How much money, you know, and a gap might not even look like a gap. He might have three jobs, but it's over here to over here to over here, driving back and forth all over town when it could just be flipped around a little bit. And now he has room for a fourth job and that's a 2, 000 difference times, you know, five trucks, 10 truck, whatever that adds up real quick. Yeah, so on the CSR side or on the service side and then also on the production side Well, would you start working with me or you have a conversation with me and I asked you junior numbers I only care about if you know a couple numbers, you know How much production do you have up this week and how much how much sales are you gonna have this week? And what did you do last week? So yeah And, and it is shocking how nobody knows. And, and not, not nobody, but I, I I would say, you know, of guys that have less than six or seven trucks that don't have someone who's supposed to own numbers and do it, how they're supposed to know that, that number, they don't know it. They have no clue. They have no clue if they're profiting this month or this week. And, and I, I open their eyes. When I, when, when I say, well, you got to go find, what are your bills? Just what are your bills for a month? No. What were your bills last month? Okay. They were, I'm just going to use, they were 40, 000. Okay. So that means your bills every week are 10 grand. Do you schedule more than 10, 000 a week in work? I don't know. I'm like, how do you, how do you run a business? You know, business one on one not knowing the schedule for profits. So the next part of that is, is I'll, is I'll go, let's look at your calendar and you look at the calendar, right? And there it's full. It's, it looks busy. Add it all up. Was it equal 7, 400, but we're busy. You're busy losing money. It's that, it's that serious. And it's so funny. Hey, hi guys. I don't know who that is. And so, but hi, um, It's funny how it's the most, it's the most basic thing you're in business for, right? So to support your family minimum, yet you don't even know if you're making any money. And it just, it doesn't drive me crazy. It drives me. What drives me crazy is after I started working with people and I'm working with them four or five months and they still can't tell me their number. And I'm like drilling it into them. It's like, what? We got to get past this. You've got to start knowing your numbers. And, and, and, and if you're the guy that just, IE is not going to do that. We give it to a call center girl, let her tell you how much production you got. That was such a game changer for us in this last year, having our dispatchers, like, this is your, this is your baby. And so they start out in the morning, you know, it could be some crazy number, you know, 30 grand, whatever. And they're, they're working it and they're going back and forth. I hear them. I'm, my office is kind of close to them. So I can hear them talking about it. What do we have up now? Blah, blah, blah. And then, um. They do basically send us a report at the end of the day to the management team. Um, this is, I don't know if you could see that all white, white it out. Uh, oh, there's part of it. They have the revenue for the day, upcoming jobs. Upcoming jobs by division, um, different stuff and, uh, you know, how many appointments were booked, um, but they're, they're on that number and they know exactly what that number, they know how many working days there are in the month. They know what our monthly revenue goal is. Part of that's based on sales of last month. Like it's not just a number we pick out of the air. It's like, this is a number based on our sales. What, what we can actually do in revenue, um, how many working days a month. And how much needs to be up every day to meet that goal. And if they get off by a couple of days, they recalculate the numbers and go, okay, now here's, here's our new goal for the rest of the month. And you know, it's great about it. And, and I, I bet you, I bet what your answer's gonna be when I ask you, I I know the answer. It's almost a gamification for them in a, in a, in a pride thing to be able to beat your goal, right? Oh, absolutely. They probably have a blast showing you, look what we did every week, right? Oh yeah. It's so, it's not just like, oh, we filled the board. It's like, okay, we're 10 grand off. How do we do this? And then it's how do we do this? We're, we're short a guy, he's, he called in, whatever, like, do we have any managers who can, you know, hop in a truck and, and run this, or this is missing a part, like how can we get it? Like, I don't know, is there a CSR? Can they go and pick up a part? Like they'll, they'll just figure out all these crazy solutions to, to make it happen because they know what the goal is. Yeah. Having a goal is really good for the teamwork. Um, so what I'm hearing, do you guys just focus on the top line, excuse me, the top line number of what you're going to sell that day? Well, the sales is a lot more variable. I mean, we have sales goals, but that's, um, but this is for, these are jobs that are already sold. That they're working into, they're treating the schedule like a, like puzzle pieces to find places to put more revenue. Gotcha. So, to answer kind of a question Chuck a little bit about the way, me and Mike are actually talking about this in Puerto Rico. The way I do, Mike shows me this massively awesome spreadsheet he adds for top and bottom line. And then he, and then he compliments me like, well, you kind of do this the way you do it in the way I do it totally more simplified is, is, uh, is the bottom line, you know, it matters too, but, you know, cause you've got to know what your bottom line revenue is or our bills and all that kind of stuff, you know, cause that's almost a constant, right? So, but what, what we're, what you got to bring to when you're scheduling for profits. That's part of the equation that bottom line is in there Like so when I give a goal, so when mike says he gives a goal and they're down 10 000 That goal bottom line is included. It's absolutely in there We need to know and mike mike spreads it mike spreads it out a little bit. Maybe mike doing it to where he's he's doing it maybe where it is top line. Mine is all, all inclusive. Mine is top bottom line. Our goal, you know, uh, is, is a hundred thousand dollar sales in production every week. That's our goal right now. And so, and, and, and we do it. And by the way, last week it was hilarious. We did 125, 000 in sales while every manager was gone. So funny. And so I was telling him, do I really need you guys? I called him up Monday. Do I need you guys? Really? And so, uh, keep doing what you're doing. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Well, I mean, we, we know what our, for instance, Uh, break, break even number in revenue would be for the month. And we know what the revenue number would be to net 10%, 15, 20%. So that is the kind of driving force. Then we just break it down to the day and, you know, we'll have months where they start slipping at the beginning of the month. They'll, they'll be off by a little bit, be off by a little bit more, and it's like, okay, we got to get it together. Um, now that revenue number's bigger for the rest of the working days throughout the month to hit that mark. Um, or work more days, you know. Leave those Saturdays open, guys. You might just need them at the end of the month. So I'm assuming this is Jonah, and that's why StreamYard. So hi, Jonah. We love him too. And so, well, guys, it's, it's, you know, we, you know, like we always do, it's a chat with Chad. We kind of ventured off a little bit and I'm sure if you guys or anyone watching this, I hope you learned something and, uh, and go from there. So, uh, guys, thanks for coming on. I appreciate it. Uh, we'll be doing chat with Chad every week again, as I have been, uh, except for last week when I was in Puerto Rico. And, uh, I appreciate you guys. Thank you very much. Good hang out with you guys. All right, guys. So that was Chad with Chad and I pretty good, eclectic little group here. We had there, um, you know, we talked a little bit about rapport, uh, for having the first half hour about the app, how you can build rapport in, you know, and, uh, Oh, thanks, Jack. And so, um, you know, how, how you can go to my app and learn a report that can be taught over and over again and do stuff. And then we brought it to, you know, how to know your numbers a little bit and how you, how you schedule for profits, you know, just, you know, a lot of that, you know, a lot of that stuff with chimney one on one and how to train people. And so my mission, honestly. If you ever get to know me and you want to call me up for anything, free advice, anything, I'll be glad to talk to you. My mission is to help the industry. And so I'm doing other things too, but I really love this industry who made me who I am today. Uh, it gave me the opportunity to raise five kids, beautiful house, loving my wife. It was the chimney industry that did it. And so I want to give back. I want to help, you know? And so if you want to talk to me about chimney closure, go to chimneyclosure. com. Go ahead, uh, you click the button, you can make an appointment with me, I'll show it to you. It's 1, 000 to sign up and 100 a guy every month. It's that, it's that simple. I'll be upgrading it at all times. I give you, once you get in there, if you own, if the owner of the company, I'll flip it to where you're an administrator in there, and you can actually make your own scripting and do stuff, and I'll show you how to play with the AI and everything else. And the sky's the limit. I'm with the company that started this app and we are really, really working on getting this app to really go to places we, they didn't even dream it could go. And now that I'm helping them out. And so we really are, uh, at the fledgling thing of now training, how to give the deliverable of how to make people be better sales from the beginning. So guys, that's my time. And so I appreciate it. I love the industry. Good night.